High winds and dry conditions are sparking wildfires across South Dakota. The map above indicates the general area in which these fires are burning as of Thursday, April 14, 2022.

A couple of notable fires include a 92-acre fire in Stanley County near Hayes, South Dakota, and a 9-acre fire near Lake Andes. Another hotspot is just a few miles northwest of Rapid City.

Red Flag Warnings were issued due to the strong winds between 30 and 60 mph.

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The majority of the state's fires are along the South Dakota - Nebraska border.

The northern half of the state is clear from fires after a healthy dose of snow earlier this week.

Sunday afternoon, U.S. Highway 19 was closed near Vermilion after a large grass fire broke out, according to CBS14 Fox 44 Siouxland News. That fire also destroyed a barn and a bridge.

Last week, central Nebraska had a tragic fire that claimed 30,000 acres and left scores of livestock dead.

"It’s pretty well understood that global warming is fueling a growth in explosive wildfires." ~ Darren Clabo, state fire meteorologist for South Dakota

The spring vegetation "greening-up" has yet to occur and the small amounts of snow we received over the winter have left very dry conditions heading into what has so far been a very windy spring.

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