Before Tuesday game with the Washington Nationals at Citizens Bank Park, Phillies manager Joe Girardi was asked if he planned to ask umpires to check on a pitcher who seemed suspicious with the new rules on banned substances.

"I'm not going to play games," Girardi told reporters pregame. "That's silly.  Just if you see something that is clear-cut, we'd probably ask."

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Washington ace pitcher Max Scherzer was checked by umpires for banned substances twice before the fourth inning in the game between the Phillies and Nationals on Tuesday night.

Phillies manager Joe Girardi didn't think that was enough.

Girardi asked umpires to check Scherzer during the bottom of the fourth inning, and an early preview of the Fourth of July fireworks display followed.

A irate Scherzer tossed his hat to the ground, and began to unbuckle his belt before looking over to Girardi to give him a piece of his mind.

However that wasn't the end of the firework display. As Scherzer was leaving the field after the bottom of the fifth inning, he gave a WWE-like glare over to Girardi, which promoted the Phillies skipper to wave him over, as to challenge him to a 60-minute no-time limit battle.

Scherzer would hold up his hat again, as if to suggest Girardi was being childish by asking the umpires to check on him in the middle of the inning.

Girardi would end up being ejected from the game.

"I've never seen him wipe his head like he was going tonight," Girardi explained when asked why he asked the umpires to check on Scherzer in mid-inning. "It was suspicious for me. I have respect for Max, but I have to do what's right for our team."

Scherzer when asked why he was putting his hands through his hair said that he was trying to get some sort of moisture on his hand to mix with the rosin.

"I'd have to be an absolute fool to use something tonight," Scherzer stated.

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