There is no denying that times are tough right now with high gas prices, rising interest rates, skyrocketing inflation, supply line issues, product shortages, and an economy that appears to be teetering on the brink of collapsing.

It's gotten so bad out there that even panhandlers are being assaulted for their signs!

As Dakota News Now reports, a Sioux Falls panhandler was assaulted earlier this week after he was given money. The report states that a woman stopped her car to give money to a panhandler holding a sign. Once she did, another man ran up and demanded the money the woman had just given the victim. The woman informed the man the money was intended for the panhandler holding the sign, which prompted the suspect in the case to punch the panhandler and then take his sign. What's really odd he didn't steal the money, just the sign. 

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Police say it's not uncommon in Sioux Falls for panhandlers to get into physical altercations with each other as they attempt to claim a street corner to panhandle.

As the city continues to grow in size, so do the numbers of panhandlers on high-traffic street corners and throughout downtown Sioux Falls city streets.

The city also sees an increase in its panhandling numbers as nicer weather returns to the area each year.

Is panhandling legal in South Dakota?

Yes, panhandling is technically legal in the state. However, there are rules panhandlers must follow. For instance, according to the Sioux Falls Police Department's Facebook page, panhandlers cannot aggressively solicit money or goods from bystanders or motorists. Panhandlers are also unable to legally solicit money or goods on private property without permission. It is prohibited for panhandlers to step into or walk around in traffic to accept money or goods, and it's also illegal for motorists to hold up traffic flow to facilitate an exchange of money or goods with a panhandler. 

South Dakota panhandling laws
Sioux Falls Police Department
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Police told Dakota News Now, should you feel compelled to help out those in need, it's often better to donate to organizations designed to help the less fortunate rather than giving money directly to panhandlers on the street. In many cases, police have found that panhandlers use the money they receive from good Samaritans to support substance abuse habits.

Source: Dakota News Now/ Sioux Falls Police Department 

9 Driving Laws in South Dakota that Might Surprise You, Some You Didn't Know Existed

There are some things you can do on South Dakota roads that you may have once thought illegal but aren't. Like, can you ride in the back of a pickup, or drive barefoot in South Dakota?

While perusing the South Dakota Department of Public Safety I was reminded of some things that come up in conversation quite often.

Here are a few to ponder:

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Take a deep dive into some of South Dakota’s most notorious and little know murders, missing persons, and other true crime stories from the Mount Rushmore State.